THE GARDENS OF BOXWOOD MANOR
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NATIVE PLANTS

WHY NATIVE PLANTS ARE THE BEST

Native plants are the best because they are hardy  in your climate, resist the diseases and insect pests, and adapted to the soil in your area.

Search for the native plants at your local nursery, on-line plant lists, and in books such as the one listed below. These are the most reliable and stand the best chance of survival. The wildlife and butterflies need these plants for their continued existence.

Birds that migrate through your area need these plants to sustain them on their trips. When none are used and only exotic ornamentals, then the wildlife either tries to find some natives nearby or the natives die out.

VEGETABLES AND HEIRLOOM SPECIES

There are plants that no longer exist due to breeding better plants. The goal of the Seed Banks is to save the original plant seeds before they are lost to extinction through breeding much better  plants of other ways.

Some companies still sell the Heirloom Species of vegetables, for example,  such as maize. This is the forerunner of our today’s corn. It is good to plant these to see what the original plant looked like and for  historical gardens.

Other vegetable  are just as well not planted  so the seed is saved in the Seed Banks, such as at Kew Gardens in Great Britain.

I certainly wouldn’t want the original tomato or grapefruit to eat–all seeds and no pulp!

CULTIVARS ARE GOOD, TOO!

What’ s a CULTIVAR? This is short for CULTIVATED VARIETY.

For example, take some of the native plants-American hollies-for one. By breeding the American holly with the English holly, a stronger plant was developed from the American holly and a more beautiful look was developed from the English holly.

Another plant is the native daylily which has many beautiful cultivars now from plant breeding. There are so many more. Some plants are bred for more hardiness, insect and disease resistance, and beauty.

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